Marawi Crisis

A composite group of ISIS-inspired militants ambushed a military vehicle that was reportedly on a mission to serve a warrant of arrest upon Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) leader Isnilon Hapilon, who was believed to be hiding in the area in the afternoon of 23 May 2017. This began a protracted armed confrontation between this group and the AFP. By the same evening, the confrontation escalated to other barangays in the city as the pro-ISIS group began increasing its forces, reportedly occupied civilian structures, including school buildings, churches, the Philippine National Police Outpost, and a hospital. Killings and hostage-taking of civilians were also reported. In less than 24 hours, the pro-ISIS group was able to control strategic locations in the center of the city, including government facilities.

The situation prompted President Rodrigo Duterte to place the whole island of Mindanao under Martial Law for 60 days, which was later extended to December 31, 2017. Massive civilian displacement occurred as a result of the growing tension, starting in the early morning of 24 May. More military troops were deployed, and clashes continued over the next several weeks. The Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) launched a combination of mortar shelling and air strikes against the MG. Most of the civilians have taken refuge in Iligan City and other nearby towns within Region X. An estimated 98 percent of the total population of Marawi City (201,785 individuals in 96 barangays, based on the 2015 census) have sought shelter in different evacuation centers or with their relatives. The crisis has also affected economic and commercial activities in the rest of Lanao del Sur province, triggering further displacement.

Fourteen weeks into the conflict, the AFP and PNP continue implementing clearing operations in Marawi city. The number of displaced persons has been pegged since July 26, 2017 by government sources at 78,466 families (359,680 individuals). This is a 33.4 percent reduction from the 117,875 families (534,127 individuals) reported prior to the data cleansing initiated by the DSWD based on the encoded data from the Disaster Assistance Family Access Cards (DAFAC). Data provided does not anymore indicate the number of IDPs that are home-based and are found in evacuation centers. However, based on pre-DAFAC statistics, 94 percent of total displaced population is with host families in 9 regions. The remainder is still living in the remaining 75 listed evacuation centers. This data includes secondary displacement that has reportedly occurred in nearby municipalities. Most of the IDPs still remain displaced. Return into Marawi is not allowed by authorities due to prevailing security threats.

Survey Snapshot Issue No. 4: Freedom of Movement
Quick Municipal Protection Profile of Pantao Ragat, Lanao del Norte
Survey Snapshot Issue No. 3: Access to Information and IDP Participation
Survey Snapshot Issue No. 2: IDP Return and Housing, Land and Property
Thematic Protection Bulletin | Closing the Gaps | Issue No. 3
Survey Snapshot Issue No. 1: Access to Humanitarian Assistance
Thematic Protection Bulletin | Closing the Gaps | Issue No. 2
Quick Municipal Protection Profile of Pantar, Lanao del Norte
IDP Protection Assessment Report, AFP vs Pro-ISIS militants in Marawi City, Lanao del Sur Issue No. 4
Quick Municipal Protection Profile of Saguiaran, Lanao del Sur
Thematic Protection Bulletin | Closing The Gaps | Issue No. 1
Quick Municipal Protection Profile of Baloi, Lanao del Norte
IDP Protection Assessment Report, AFP vs Pro-ISIS militants in Marawi City, Lanao del Sur Issue No. 3
IDP Protection Assessment Report, AFP vs Maute Group in Marawi City, Lanao del Sur Issue no. 2
IDP Protection Assessment Report, AFP vs Maute Group in Marawi City, Lanao del Sur Issue no. 1
Armed confrontations and displacement in Marawi City, Issue no. 2
Armed confrontations and displacement in Marawi City, Issue no. 1